Helping Sick and Injured Animals

 

Tucker is resting comfortably at home after surgery to repair his broken leg.

 

McVitie Fund Challenge a huge success!

Thank you to all of you who donated to our McVitie Fund Challenge Grant through the holiday season and before. Thanks to you, we reached our goal of $20,000 four months ahead of schedule! That means that we now have $40,000 to cover badly needed veterinary care for deserving animals.

Our McVitie Fund is always stressed to the limit. There are so many in need! You can still donate to the fund at any time. Your gift will mean we can say YES! to one more pet guardian who finds him or herself down on their luck and lacking funds to pay for emergency veterinary care for their precious friend. Thank you for all the joy you bring and for all the animals you help us keep in their forever loving homes!

 

 

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The McVitie Fund

The McVitie Fund is named in memory of a little ginger cat named McVitie, who was rescued in Portugal and brought back to Canada by a VHS supporter. McVitie lived a long and happy life, but when he became ill, his guardian did everything he could to save him. After McVitie passed, his guardian wanted to help other people who find themselves without the resources to help their beloved pets. Most of the people we help are living on disability income or old age pensions. Their animals already have loving homes – we just help keep them there! VHS also helps low-income individuals spay or neuter their companion animals. We work with local vets who provide us with low-cost care, so that we can stretch our donation dollars as far as possible. Your donation of $50 will spay/neuter, tattoo and provide vaccinations for one cat. Thank you for helping us help animals!

The McVitie Fund provided help for Sandra and her cat named Tarantula. Here’s their story!

 

Tarantula was an eight-week old feral kitten that came to me through the Vancouver SPCA foster program. He came by his name for his incessant hiding, attacking and biting, and the fact that he was a very attractive medium haired black kitten that could only be mollified by belly rubs. 

He’s a chewer, always has been. Shoes, toys, bones, wires, phones – and things that make his mom get out of bed. He loves to chew almost as much as he loves to eat. Tarantula will grab food from my plate or fork if I’m not vigilant. That cat will pry my mouth open to get his wine gums!

He also loves flowers. When we’re in the garden together he will smell the flowers I point to and seems to enjoy the simple freedom of the back yard. He doesn’t wander far, preferring to stay close by in case he hears the sound of his favourite treat being offered at the door.

In February, he started losing weight and stopped using the litter box. After a few vet visits and many expensive tests, he was diagnosed with diabetes, requiring twice daily shots of insulin and a special diet. At that time, I was unemployed and struggling with a disability of my own, but Tarantula is such a vital part of my life and has only me to rely on. I could not fail this friend in need who has given me his lifetime of love and companionship. At 15 years old, he is still very active and vital, and otherwise healthy. After a worry-filled two weeks, Tarantula began to perk up and put on some weight.  

The end of May marked a time of financial crisis for me. Among pressing bills and my own poor health, I had not found suitable work. Tarantula’s insulin and food had run out and I was faced with very difficult choices. The Vancouver Humane Society stepped in to help and I am so truly grateful. With the generous help of the VHS, I am able to concentrate on keeping a roof over our heads and food on our plates, with Tarantula by my side to cheer me on.

 

We’ve helped hundreds of animals like Tarantula (and sometimes even their rescuers!) but there are so many more that need us – that’s where the McVitie Fund comes in!